Archive for November 5, 2015

The 4th Asian Americans in Media (AAIM) Film Festival @ The Claremont Colleges (Saturday, November 14, Pitzer College)

ORGANIZED AND CURATED BY MS100 PZ (ASIAN AMERICANS IN MEDIA) STUDENTS from films shown at the 2014 and 2015 Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 14
SHORTS PROGRAM I & II
2:00PM
Q116, Mosbacher/Gartrell Center for Media Experimentation & Activism
West Hall, Pitzer College

Still from Insomnia (2014) Dir. Brian Tran

Still from Insomnia (2014) Dir. Brian Tran

I. ALTERNATE REALITIES
In a highly globalized, commodified, and technological world, science fiction doubles as a possible future as well as horrific fantasy. See the investment of Asian Americans in science fiction and horror in regards to the body, memory, and self. What does it mean for Asian Americans to dream, obsess, fantasize, fear, and otherwise speculate about the future and other realms?  These shorts span a wide range of media genres, geographical locations, and historical periods.  Yet all imagine an alternate reality for Asian Americans that is outside our day-to-day lives.

THE DEVICE (2013) Dir. Conrad Lihilihi

MEMORY SCULPTOR (2013) Dir. Ken Ochiai

INSOMNIA (2014) Dir. Brian Tran

ROOM 731 (2014) Dir. Youngmin Kim

COMFORT GIRLS (2014) Dir. Eugene Lee Yang

Still from Sex, Politics, and Sticky Rice (2014) Dir. Tina Takemoto

Still from Sex, Politics, and Sticky Rice (2014) Dir. Tina Takemoto

II. RESISTANCE
My Dear Americans,
Increasing accessibility to media has enabled Asian Americans to resist systemic racism and oppression through the medium of film and video. These shorts expose the plethora of collective experiences and shared histories of Asian American communities. We see them as good examples of deconstructing stereotypes and reconstructing representation. These films depict Asian Americans addressing issues of race and stereotypes in a variety of techniques such as: satire, poetry, documentaries and many more. We hope after viewing our program, you will have a better understanding of what it means to be “Asian American”

COMFORT GIRLS (2014) Dir. Eugene Lee Yang
LONE HUNTER (2014) Dir. Pascal Leister
#BLACKPOWERYELLOWPERIL (2015) Dir. Jenifer Logia
SEX, POLITICS, AND STICKY RICE (2014) Dir. Tina Takemoto
MY DEAR AMERICANS (2013) Dir. Arpita Kumar

FESTIVAL RECEPTION
4:30PM
Benson Auditorium, Pitzer College

FGB-cropped

Still from Farah Goes Bang (2013) Dir. Meera Menon

FARAH GOES BANG
(2013) Dir. Meera Menon
6:00PM
Benson Auditorium, Pitzer College
Election year special!  It’s 2004 and three young women are about to embark on trip of their lifetimes: a cross-country road trip from California to swing state of Ohio in order to help with John Kerry’s Presidential campaign. But politics are not the only topic on these women’s minds. Barely on the cusp of full-fledge adulthood and tasting their first true freedom from family and home, they are determined to make their experience memorable. Farah, in fact, has set upon a mission,as deeply committed as her view on social change, of finally losing her virginity. USC School of Cinematic Arts alumna Meera Menon, in an assured effort informed by classic feminist text Thelma & Louise and the popular yet controversial TV show Girls, deftly balance witty comedic dialogue with stark dramatic moments in this insightful indie film.

ALL FESTIVAL EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
All Festival screenings at Pitzer College. Festival filmmakers will be present at all screenings.

This Festival is funded in part by the support of the Endowed Fund for Media Studies, Intercollegiate Media Studies (IMS) at the Claremont Colleges.  Additional thanks to Abraham Ferrer, Visual Communications; Gena Hamamoto, UCLA Center for EthnoCommuications, and Michael Rabaja Pedro, Intercollegiate Department of Asian American Studies (IDAAS) at the Claremont Colleges.

Further inquiries, contact: Prof. Ming-Yuen S. Ma ming-yuen_ma@pitzer.edu

November 5, 2015 at 10:30 pm Leave a comment

Chan is Missing Introduction – Milagros Montalvo & Edmund Pacleb

Chan is Missing (1982), directed by Wayne Wang, is a film that explores the Asian American community in San Francisco’s Chinatown through the journey of Steve and Jo, two Chinese American cab drivers who are desperately looking to find their lost and mysterious acquaintance, Chan Hung. By finding clues about Chan Hung through different members of the Chinatown community, the audience learns intimate details about the characters representative of the Chinese American community. The audience sees that the Chinese American community, and in extension, the Asian American community, is full of diversity and cannot be easily categorized.

Film scholar Peter Cheng asserts, “Each character…holds a donut that contains the possibility of the Chinese American identity in its center.” The more we unpack the individual characters, the wider this hole becomes, and the more room there is for the representation of Asian American communities.

Discussion Questions:

How does the film construct a positive Asian American Identity?

Who or what does Chan represent?

How is this film similar or different to the independent films we previously looked at?

November 5, 2015 at 6:01 pm Leave a comment


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